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The-17-Best-White-Paint-Colors

ABOUT THE INFOGRAPHIC

The 17 best white paint colors are arranged around The Color Strategist Color Wheel according to their hue family.

If you put the paint chips in the same order, you will easily be able to see the spectral gradation of hue.

Let’s talk about hue family for a sec.

Hue family is scientifically determined by measuring a color with a colorimeter or spectrophotometer. It’s the wavelength part of that measurement that defines a color’s hue family.

Hue family is objective, accurate and consistent because of the way colorimeters and spectrophotometers work.

Both (colorimeter or spectrophotometer) take measurements using a consistent light source and illumination method. Because of how they work, they also create consistent measurement conditions. Doesn’t matter if it’s day or night, indoors or outdoors.

The result is anytime and anywhere you have a fast, easy, and accurate way to measure color and quantify how the human vision system sees color.

In Camp Chroma’s on-line, on-demand color training programs you learn how color works. Because it’s only logical that the simple, straightforward color system that is used to make color is the same system we use for specifying color.

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8 thoughts on “The 17 Best White Paint Colors”

  1. This is by far the best list of white paint hues! Thank you.

    I live in the SW and the best paint to use here is Dunn Edwards which is formulated for hot and dry. With that being said I would like to add my favorite DE white which is called just that;
    White DEW380 LRV 93
    Munsell: HUE=4.03GY VALUE=9.6 CHROMA=0.1
    Holy cats, look at the LRV 93 and value at 9.6! None of the other whites have these numbers.

  2. That’s a good one. I don’t talk about DE much because it has such a limited distribution. But I adore the brand: color tools are awesome, quality paint and the color palette is fabulous.

  3. Hi Lori! I just wanted to tell you that this chart has been an absolute life saver as I’ve renovated our newly purchased 1950s home this year. I cannot tell you the number of times I have referred to it! So, I actually came back today because I’m planning on painting our exterior Stonington Gray in hopes of achieving a Cape Cod beachy feel, but I’m stuck trying to find the perfect bright white trim. I just found DE White online today and came here to see if any BM or SW fall in the same range. Now I’m seeing this conversation in the comments. I cannot get DE White where I am located. Any recommendations for BM or SW equivalent? Thank you so much!

  4. “Equivalent” in another brand doesn’t really work in the case of most colors of white. Because so much depends on the color of the base paint and each brand’s bases are unique.

    But pull chips of Chantilly Lace, White OC-151, Super White and Simply White. All four would work just depends on which one works the best with the other elements on your house, like windows, and which one you like the best.

  5. Samantha Lafleur

    If I’m using Alabaster as a wall color would any of those colors above work for a trim color or will it make Alabaster look dingy and yellowish?

  6. Hi Samantha,

    The rule of thumb you want to follow is there needs to be a difference of 0.20 (give or take a few) in Chroma. It’s about contrast and it just about guarantees that neither color of white will make the other look dirty or dingy.

    For example, a good trim/door/cabinet color with Alabaster walls would be SW 7006 Extra White.

    Alabaster’s Chroma is 0.66 and Extra White’s is 0.32. So the difference in Chroma is 0.34.

  7. Lori, I’ve noticed the values you measure for Dunn Edwards differ from those that the company itself reports. I imagine this is due to differences in lighting. I was wondering where their purest white (White DEW380) would fit in the awesome wheel of colors you created for BM and SW! Please do DEW380 next!

  8. Hi Patti,

    What’s important is that the difference is very small. Though the notations may differ, it’s still withing a tight hue family, value and chroma range.

    The difference could be attributed to one – or all – of these three things:

    1. Different samples were measured. While paint chips have to meet some of the strictest paint industry standards for accuracy, nothing is 100%
    2. Different instruments were used. There is generally good agreement between instruments but unless they are calibrated for the same workflow loop, marginal differences in measurement is to be expected.
    3. Math. Using two or three decimal points in the transformation can affect results. Also, which reference white is used in equations can make a difference.

    Keep in mind measuring color, quantifying how the human eye sees color, is more complicated than using a ruler to measure a piece of paper, for example.

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Am I seeing this color right?

You can stop second guessing what you think a color looks like.

The Color Strategist Color Wheel is an invaluable color tool that tells you what hue family a color belongs to.

Get the color wheel, plus instructions for how to use it for FREE when you subscribe to Camp Chroma.

The Color Strategist Color Wheel by Lori Sawaya